比太阳更光

5 points to whoever gets the URL and title reference.

Interests: Linguistics, Math, Science

Fandoms: Animorphs, Avatar: The Last Airbender, Calvin and Hobbes, Digimon, Doctor Who, Fire Emblem, Legend of Korra, Merlin, On Call 36小时/The Hippocratic Crush, BBC!Sherlock, Young Wizards

What once was an "academic" like blog has now turned mostly into a fandom blog. Oops.

One of these days, it'll be a Panda Coffee blog again. Stay tuned. :O

27th July 2014

Photo reblogged from [leɪ̃ŋˈnæstɪks & ˌsaɪkoʊsˈθɛnɪks] with 1,416 notes

spacephilosopher:

Motion Induced Blindness
If you look at the image for about 10 seconds, focusing on the flickering green dot, one, two, or all three yellow dots will disappear. Well, they won’t really disappear, they’ll still be there, but you just won’t see them anymore.
This is called motion induced blindness, a perceptual illusion studied in the field of cognitive psychology. The main cause of this perceptual illusion is still debated among scientists, but the effect is clearly cool.

spacephilosopher:

Motion Induced Blindness

If you look at the image for about 10 seconds, focusing on the flickering green dot, one, two, or all three yellow dots will disappear. Well, they won’t really disappear, they’ll still be there, but you just won’t see them anymore.

This is called motion induced blindness, a perceptual illusion studied in the field of cognitive psychology. The main cause of this perceptual illusion is still debated among scientists, but the effect is clearly cool.

Source: spacephilosopher

26th July 2014

Post reblogged from i'll swallow you whole with 54,964 notes

theladymonsters:

magesmagesmages:

sounds-simple-right:

badscienceshenanigans:

kbdownie:

thegingermullet:

Did they ever reveal how Captain America was thawed? Because I’m picturing a bunch of Shield agents with hair dryers and I don’t think that’s quite right.

I don’t think they’d want to microwave him so hair dryer is really the only remaining option. That’s how I’d do it.
badscienceshenanigans
Do you have a sciency way to accomplish this task?


Well, let’s see. 

To thaw a 1.5 metric ton colossal squid frozen in a block of ice (the only way the fishermen who trawled the thing in could bring it home before it went bad), scientists put it in a big vat of brine just above 0 Celsius/32F. That allowed the fresh water to melt while still keeping the squid as cold as possible. Essential, since for a giant corpse with tentacles, certain parts are bound to thaw days before others and could become quite rotten before the rest comes out of the ice block if you’re not careful. 

HOWEVER Captain America was still alive, which complicates things. On the other hand, even supersoldiers are significantly smaller than this record-setting colossal squid. This helps thaw logistics somewhat.

Much like the squid, Captain America would have to be kept at a consistent temperature throughout his body in order to be thawed successfully. If his extremities were to thaw more than a minute or two before his heart and lungs were thawed and reactivated, the tissue wouldn’t have any oxygen and would quickly die. What a shame to bring back Steve Rogers only to have him be the poster boy for gangrene. Brain tissue becoming metabolically active before the cardiovascular system began functioning would be even more disastrous— possible permanent brain damage. 

And the GH-325 project was born

To keep his temperature as equal as possible across his entire body, something like the squid brine or (more likely) an antifreeze solution would be used. Immerse the Capsicle in brine until the entire unit is within a degree or two of thawing* to begin Phase II.

*Note that due to presence of salts, fats, protein, etc, the freezing point of meat is actually 28-29F. Apologies to non-US readers, sadly I only work with American meat and don’t know the freezing point of corpses/beef in Sane Country Units. That being said, Steve Rogers is 100% American meat. Fahrenheit shall be considered the appropriate unit for this project. 

At the thawing point, it’s important to consider life support functions. I don’t know how fast human tissue uses up oxygen at refrigerator-range temperatures, but I’m going to assume that the sooner you have oxygen circulating the better. A heart-lung machine would be needed to oxygenate and move the blood around for a while before the heart gets started back up. 

Meanwhile, because Captain America’s last un-frozen moments were spent deep underwater, there may be decompression issues at play. Whatever gas bubbles may have been present in his tissue are currently frozen in place, but when he thaws they can move about and create embolisms —> the bends. Better put him in a hyperbaric chamber just in case. 

Since Captain America regained consciousness in a recovery room rather than during the thaw process, it may be safe to assume that he was sedated and/or placed in a drug-induced coma during thaw. 

So at this point we’ve got a giant bathtub of brine, a heart-lung machine, oxygen canisters, lots of drugs, plus all the necessary monitoring equipment all inside a hyperbaric chamber. After thawing the antifreeze bath could be replaced with gradually warming water or saline solution in order to bring Captain America back up to normal body temperature. So many machines! This is US medicine at its finest.

Forced warm air blowers (hairdryers) are needed after Captain America is fully thawed, organ systems are reactivated, and he is brought back to normal body temperature. At this point it becomes necessary to dry and style Captain America and put him in period-appropriate jammies to sleep it off in a vintage hospital room. If you think hearing the wrong baseball game tipped him off fast, you should see him wake up with bad hair. 

image

THIS IS THE BEST POST IN THE HISTORY OF EVERYTHING.

That being said, Steve Rogers is 100% American meat. Fahrenheit shall be considered the appropriate unit for this project. 

Source: thegingermullet

23rd July 2014

Post with 1 note

Wordceptonance

Wordceptonance: Resonating between a word and a concept.

Tagged: organic chemistrylinguisticsbecause the answer to everything is resonancemr long hair coined that onethe word not the concept

16th July 2014

Quote reblogged from Animorphs Quote of the Day with 54 notes

"How did it feel to fall into a crocodile pit, then have your house fall down on you?"

"Not very good," I answered.

"Don’t you think you’re incredibly lucky?"

"Um, no. If I were lucky I wouldn’t keep falling. Right?"

"But you weren’t hurt either time."

"I think winning the lottery would be lucky. Having the house fall on me, that’s not all that lucky."

Behind the cameras I saw a familiar face. Cassie. The two of us locked eyes. All I could do was shrug.

"Do you have any advice for other kids like yourself?"

"Um, yes. My advice is don’t fall into crocodile pits and don’t have the house fall on you."

— Book #12: The Reaction, pg. 44 (by K.A. Applegate)

Tagged: animorphscan you tell how i developed my deadpan attitude and voice?

25th June 2014

Quote reblogged from [leɪ̃ŋˈnæstɪks & ˌsaɪkoʊsˈθɛnɪks] with 1,342 notes

Becoming bilingual is a way of life. Every bone and fiber of your being is affected in some way as you struggle to reach beyond the confines of your first language and into a new language, a new culture, a new way of thinking, feeling, and acting.
Principles of Language Learning and Teaching, H. Douglas Brown (via raincium)

Tagged: linguistics

Source: raincium

15th May 2014

Photo reblogged from ✗ work in progress with 167,602 notes

thepowerofmoonlight:

Learnt an interesting thing today on this arabic course,
The original Arabic number system looked like this, the one we now use.
It was designed so each character had the corresponding number of angles to the number, so the number 1 has 1 angle, 2 has 2 angles, 3 has 3, 0 has none etc…
It is so obvious now, I’ve always assumed its one of those things that just is, with no logical explanation, but here it is, perfectly simple and satisfying

thepowerofmoonlight:

Learnt an interesting thing today on this arabic course,

The original Arabic number system looked like this, the one we now use.

It was designed so each character had the corresponding number of angles to the number, so the number 1 has 1 angle, 2 has 2 angles, 3 has 3, 0 has none etc…

It is so obvious now, I’ve always assumed its one of those things that just is, with no logical explanation, but here it is, perfectly simple and satisfying

Tagged: mathematics

10th May 2014

Photo reblogged from For Eye and Tongue with 74,029 notes

Source: caramelzappa

10th May 2014

Quote reblogged from Hawkingbird with 19 notes

I guess you never really know someone till you see them scared. And even scared to death, with tears running down her face, Rachel had strength to spare.
— Jake, Animorphs #1: The Invasion, K.A. Applegate (via annasfriels)

Tagged: animorphs

24th March 2014

Quote reblogged from For Eye and Tongue with 223 notes

Animorphs was not the first book series to dramatize the transformative aspects of adolescence, but it stands out for its especially direct metaphor. K.A. Applegate’s young-adult series was never timid about exploiting its gimmick—namely, that there are teenagers who can turn into animals. It’s right there in the name of the series, in the flipbook at the right corner of each book’s pages, and in the iconic cover illustrations. These illustrations, which show the protagonists in the throes of transformation, convey that the metamorphoses in Animorphs aren’t the usual child-friendly changes—a pumpkin into a carriage or a mouse into a footman. No, these mutations are messy, risky, and perverse…
In essence, Animorphs tells the story of a group of adolescents going through changes they don’t understand, surrounded by adults who at best will never understand them and at worst will force them to conform—or kill them. The heroes know the immense magnitude of their struggles, but no one can support them. In other words, it was pitched perfectly to teenagers, who are going through the same experience on a smaller scale.
— Matt Crowley, The A.V. Club (via lesserjoke)

Tagged: animorphsthe a.v. club

19th March 2014

Post reblogged from lingua fandom with 111,731 notes

tiauska:

I feel like one of the greatest conquests of the english language is the phrase ‘I’ma’ because it’s an abbreviation for ‘I am going to’ like we managed to subtract all the spaces and three-fourths of the letters and we still know what it means that’s powerful

Tagged: linguistics

Source: mistressofthefags

18th March 2014

Photoset reblogged from mpreg glitter at posey's wedding with 16,860 notes

I’m here to save my best friend.

Tagged: teen wolflydia martinallison argentow my feels just owteen wolf spoilers

Source: melissamccall

17th March 2014

Quote reblogged from [leɪ̃ŋˈnæstɪks & ˌsaɪkoʊsˈθɛnɪks] with 2,798 notes

Different languages talk about the world in different ways. It is crucial to look at different languages. If we restrict our view to just one language - our own - we will never truly understand the distinction between sense and reference, because it is natural to think that “our” way of talking about the world is the only one, or the most natural one. It is only when we study or learn a foreign language, and realize that other people see things differently, that we become aware of how arbitrary the relationship is between words and entities or concepts.
— How Language Works by David Crystal, page 188. (via linguaphilioist)

Tagged: linguistics

Source: linguaphilioist

17th March 2014

Post with 6 notes

tumblr, why is your tagging system the worst

Until then, we fight.
— 

K.A. Applegate, from The Invasion

(via the-final-sentence)

I obviously saw this quote from the-final-sentence, but wanted to repost it so that it would land into the Animorphs tag, since reblogged posts don’t make it in. (Reblog the original though and show some more love for Animorphs!)

But, can we talk about this though? Like for real.

This final line is just the ending of Book 1 of 52+. And this is just after these teenagers (with attitude. Elfangor, recruit teenage idiots with attitude and a death wish) have been told the Earth is being invaded by aliens who you can’t see because they take over humans and who can you even trust? (Nobody. That’s who.) And they begrudgingly accept this power and responsibility to fight. And their first rescue mission? IS A COMPLETE DISASTER.

Like way to go protagonists. How do you manage that? You’re the effing protagonists.

Because it’s war. That’s why. You win some; you lose some. It doesn’t always go smoothly. And K.A. Applegate never shied away from this.

And after the horrors of almost being trapped in the enemy base, having one of your own forever stuck as a bird, and only managing to rescue one person who wasn’t even the main person you were after, what do these kids do?

Keep fighting until their reinforcements arrive, whenever they do. “Until then, we fight.” 

"If you’re going through hell, keep going."

Tagged: animorphsthis is the reason why i always consider animorphs to be one of the key series of my childhoodi've also been on a power rangers kick lately if you couldn't tell

17th March 2014

Quote reblogged from The final sentence. with 265 notes

Until then, we fight.

K.A. Applegate, from The Invasion

(via the-final-sentence)

Can we talk about this though? Like for real.

This final line is just the ending of Book 1 of 52+. And this is just after these teenagers (with attitude. Elfangor, recruit teenage idiots with attitude and a death wish) have been told the Earth is being invaded by aliens who you can’t see because they take over humans and who can you even trust? (Nobody. That’s who.) And they begrudgingly accept this power and responsibility to fight. And their first rescue mission? IS A COMPLETE DISASTER.

Like way to go protagonists. How do you manage that? You’re the effing protagonists.

Because it’s war. That’s why. You win some; you lose some. It doesn’t always go smoothly. And K.A. Applegate never shied away from this.

And after the horrors of almost being trapped in the enemy base, having one of your own forever stuck as a bird, and only managing to rescue one person who wasn’t even the main person you were after, what do these kids do?

Keep fighting until their reinforcements arrive, whenever they do. “Until then, we fight.” 

"If you’re going through hell, keep going."

Tagged: animorphsthis is the reason why i always consider animorphs to be one of the key series of my childhood

12th March 2014

Post reblogged from [leɪ̃ŋˈnæstɪks & ˌsaɪkoʊsˈθɛnɪks] with 7,618 notes

Internet Abbreviations as Discourse Particles

allthingslinguistic:

unnecessaryligatures:

I find it really interesting that abbreviations online have abandoned sound-based abbreviations (is there an actual term for it? Things like “c u l8r”) in favor of actual abbreviations for things that have nothing to do with the content itself and are more like qualifiers (lbr, tbh, imho). 

This reminds me of John McWhorter’s observations about lol and hey as discourse particles: he describes “lol” as marking empathy and “hey” as a topic shift. I’d say that the other current abbreviations like tbh, imo/imho, iirc, idk/idek, omg/omgz, wtf, etc. can have a similar type of function in marking the attitude of the speaker (well, writer) towards a particular idea.

Notice how the same statement (chosen to sound pragmatically appropriate in an informal, tumblr-like context) has a very different illocutionary force when accompanied by different markers.  

(1) tbh they’d make a terrible couple. (certain knowledge)
(2) imo they’d make a terrible couple. (belief)
(3) iirc they made a terrible couple.  (uncertain memory)
(4) idk they’d make a terrible couple. (uncertain, disbelief)
(5) omg they’d make a terrible couple. (strong emotion, excitement)
(6) wtf they’d make a terrible couple. (strong emotion, disbelief)
(7) lol they’d make a terrible couple. (empathy)

Perhaps this is the closest that English will get to having a system of evidentials

Tagged: linguistics

Source: unnecessaryligatures